Tag Archives: Vase

DAW Holiday Meeting

This months Detroit Area Woodturners meeting challenge was to bring in a turning that represents the holiday season. So I turned a happy snowman box.

For the holiday gift exchange I turned and embellished a walnut vase. Its approximately 5.5 inches tall and 3 inches wide.

 

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Rocket Vase

Rather than just doing a pewter collar on a vase I decided to try adding some additional rings with this piece.

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Vase with Pewter Collar

During the 2013 AAW symposium last June, I attended a Keith Larrett demonstration on casting and threading a pewter collar. Keith did a really good job at this session and he provided some good instructions on his processes and jigs. It took me awhile to get all the parts I needed and create the jigs but I’m finally there. This is the first collar and threaded finial.

IMG_1378_M IMG_1387_M IMG_1388_M

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Black & Wood Series Vase

Black & Wood Ash VaseI turned another of my Black & Wood series vases, this one from ash. A friend took down an ash tree on his property that was dying from an ash borer attack. I was able to divide the log he gave me into three pieces, this being the first turning from it.

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Maple Vase Modification

Remember the Red Maple vase I finished back in May? At that time I intentionally let the knot in the side of the vase crack and I didn’t fill it with anything. Well I decided to try the technique of filling cracks with solder that I learned in Arrowmont this summer. This vase provides me the perfect opportunity to do that.

Before & After:

<img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-390" alt="" src="http://studioturning.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/IMG_0592_M-200×300.jpg" width="200" height="300" class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-390" srcset="http://studioturning.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/IMG_0592_M-200×300 lisinopril hctz.jpg 200w, http://studioturning.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/IMG_0592_M.jpg 400w” sizes=”(max-width: 200px) 100vw, 200px” />

Red Maple Vase Updated Close-up

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New Vase Picture Posted

A new vase picture has been posted to the gallery. The pyrography on this vase took some time to complete. I then dyed it a deep burgundy (the color doesn’t show well in these photo’s) and added the black finial. I think it turned out nice.

Burgundy Vase

Burgundy Vase

Burgundy Vase Finial

Burgundy Vase Finial

Burgundy Vase Detail

Burgundy Vase Detail

 

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See Through Piercing Concept

I’ve seen a lot of turners pierce designs into the side of their turnings and create some really nice effects. Some even color the outside of the turning to highlight the piercings, Bihn Pho does a fantastic job of this.

One thing I haven’t seen is leaving the outside of the pierced turning one color (or just the color of the wood) and painting the inside of the turning multiple colors to show through the piercing. So I thought I would try this out with a vase.

In order to see the colors I needed to open up the sides of vase to let light in. The inside was painted with black gesso to provide a contrast for the colors.

Overall I think the concept works but it needs some tweaking for a better effect. The two pierced sections were cut at different thicknesses, the thinner one allows the colors to show through better. While I like the look of the dragonflies, a design with more/larger piercings such as butterflies should show even more color.

Dragonfly Vase

Dragonfly Vase

Dragonfly Vase Detail

Dragonfly Vase Detail

Dragonfly Vase Detail

Dragonfly Vase Detail

Dragonfly Vase Detail

Dragonfly Vase Detail

 

 

 

 

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Turning a Red Maple Vase

This post illustrates how I turned a red maple vase. It shows just one of many ways to accomplish this.

RedMaple_Vase_1This is the log I’m starting with. It measures approximately 16 long by 9 wide. It was just cut down about a week ago so it is very wet.

RedMaple_Vase_2I start by clearing the end grain sealer away so I can find the where the pith (the center, inner most rings) is located. The end grain sealer was put on the log when I first brought it home. This prevents the ends of the log from drying too quickly which would cause the log to crack.

RedMaple_Vase_3Once the pith is located on each side, I use a center punch to create an indent that will aid with the alignment when mounting the log between centers on the lathe.

RedMaple_Vase_4Time to mount the log on the lathe using the indents I just created. I like to use a safety center on the drive side of the lathe. This makes it safer when turning unbalanced material because a catch will damage the end of the log or cause it to come off the lathe.

RedMaple_Vase_5Turning a log with the bark still on is often a pain. If the log is dry, the bark tends to break off in large chunks and fly all over the shop. If the log is still wet like this one, as the bark is cut it produces a wet black liquid that covers the tools, lathe – and me. So to avoid either situation, I decided to chisel off the bark before I begin turning. The five minutes it takes to do this saves considerable more time later cleaning the tools, lathe – and me.

RedMaple_Vase_6The next step is to turn the log into a cylinder. At this point the speed is very low because the log is not balanced. As the cylinder starts to form ,I can slowly start turning up the speed.

RedMaple_Vase_7At this point I can get a good look at the grain, knots and any other imperfections. With this information I can determine how I want to position the vase and which end of the log will be the vase bottom. The picture shows a big knot in the cylinder. I will place this on the lower half of the vase.

RedMaple_Vase_8It’s easy and fun to get long strings of wood from the cuts with wet wood.

RedMaple_Vase_9Using the Golden Ratio gauge I mark out the top, bottom and widest point of the vase.

RedMaple_Vase_10I will need to cut a tenon for the chuck on the side of the log that will contain the bottom of the vase. I use the calipers to mark the diameter of the tenon.

RedMaple_Vase_11Squaring of the end of the log and creating the tenon.

RedMaple_Vase_12I now have a tenon that will fit my Vicmarc chuck. It’s time to remove the log, turn it around and mount it on the chuck.

RedMaple_Vase_13I can now turn the shape of the outside of the vase.

RedMaple_Vase_14I stop frequently to check the shape. The bottom of the vase is not turned at this point. This is because until the inside of the vase is hollowed out, I will need this wood mass to help stabilize the turning and limit vibration. But the majority of the vase shape must be finalized in this step. Usually when I have a knot in the side of the vase I will coat it with CA glue to keep it the cracking as the wood dries. For this vase I’m going to let the knot crack just to be different.

RedMaple_Vase_15The first step in hollowing out the inside is to use a drill to clear a hole down the center of the vase. Drilling is easier than using the other cutting tools. I start with a forstner bit close to the size I want to the opening at the top of the vase. Because my forstner bit is short, I can only drill in a couple inches. I then use a long spade bit to drill to the final depth of the vase.

RedMaple_Vase_16Using a captive boring bar I can hollow out the inside.

RedMaple_Vase_17The laser helps identify where the cutting bit is inside the vase. This is helpful in cutting a consistent wall thickness. I’m aiming for a 5/16th wall thickness.

RedMaple_Vase_18With the inside done, I can sand the outside. I progress through the grits down to 320.

RedMaple_Vase_19It’s now time to shape the bottom of the vase.

RedMaple_Vase_20I turn down until the foot of the vase id defined. At this point I will sand the section I just cut.

RedMaple_Vase_21With the head stock locked in position so the chuck will not rotate, I can saw through the remaining wood holding on the vase. I’ve learned the hard way not to try and turn the vase off the lathe. Using a saw is the safest way for me.

RedMaple_Vase_22Reverse chucking the vase allows me to clean up the bottom. Here I’m using a vacuum chuck to hold the vase.

RedMaple_Vase_23In order to keep the bottom from cracking I decided to dill out the pith. Using a 1 inch diameter bit in the drill press, I drilled through the bottom. I then created a plug to fill the hole from the waste still attached to the lathe chuck. This ensured the wood color would match.

RedMaple_Vase_24A large clamp is used to glue in the plug. At this point I will let the vase dry for several days before proceeding with the final sanding.

RedMaple_Vase_25After applying a sanding sealer I start the hand sanding with 400 grit paper. Often I stop at 320 grit, but for this vase I decided to take it a little further.

RedMaple_Vase_26More sanding.

RedMaple_Vase_27The final sanding is done at 600 grit.

RedMaple_Vase_28Once I’m satisfied with the sanding, the surface is cleaned with compressed air then wiped with a tack cloth. For the finish I’m using Krylon Matte Finish 1311. It comes in a spray can, covers in one coat and dries quickly.

The completed vase measures 12 ¾ by 7 ½.

RedMaple_Vase_29 RedMaple_Vase_30

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New Vase Picture Posted

Red Maple Vase

Red Maple Vase

The Red Maple Vase has finally been completed and a picture posted to the Turning Gallery. After the vase was turned and allowed to dry a Watco Danish Oil finish was applied and the Beal buffing system was used to apply a wax coating. I like the dark streak of wood running down from the hole. It looks like a tear as if the vase is crying.

 

 

 

 

 

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Red Maple

Yesterday I acquired some red maple logs that had just been cut down. From viewing the ends of the logs it looked like the wood was going to have some gorgeous coloring so I was excited to start turning. You can see from the pictures the dark and light wood provides a nice contrast. As I turned away the bark and first layer of sap wood, a hole of rotting wood appeared. This must have been from a branch that was cut or broken many years ago and the tree continued to grow over it. After the inside gets hollowed I’ll have to figure out what to do with the hole. If I can retain some of the dark wood around the inside of the opening I might just leave the hole open. But right now the task is to get it turned and dried without cracking.

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